How AI, robotics and advanced manufacturing could impact everybody’s life on Earth

What if everybody could live a wealthy, healthy, job-less and creative life in a post-scarcity Universe? Are we currently on a trajectory to this new reality and what are the obstacles we may face on the way? What are the important game-changing technologies?

TODO: create and agenda (very tentative):

1) contrast current life circumstances with a potential future
2) identify the key problems that we could solve with technology
3) review the players in society that will take part in this change
3) contrast views on the opportunities and threats of these technologies
4) …

Our future life conditions here on Earth might soon be impacted by game-changing advancements in artifical intelligence, robotics, manufacturing and genetics; at least if you ask people like Elon Mush, Andrew Ng and Ray Kurzweil. What are the most important technologies and what is the impact they might have? What are the dangers? Opinions differ so the intention here is to review and contrast what leading fiction writers, scientists, visionaries and entrepreneurs think about the question: how will AI, robots, and advanced manufacturing impact everybody’s life circumstances here on Earth?

Fiction to be reviewed

Post-scarcity:
– The Culture series

AI:
– Asimov

The Human-Computer Cortex:
– That Swedish guy who wrote sci-fi computer implants in the 70’s

Non-fiction to be reviewed

AI:
– Douglas Hofstadter: GEB

Videos to be reviewed

AI:


The Human-Computer Cortex:

News articles to be reviewed

AI:
– https://aifuture2016.stanford.edu/
– http://fortune.com/2016/06/15/future-of-work-2/
– http://www.businessinsider.com/researchers-predictions-future-artificial-intelligence-2015-10?r=US&IR=T&IR=T

3D printing:
– https://hbr.org/2013/03/3-d-printing-will-change-the-world

When to be most careful about catching the flu?

Continuing on my blogification of Peter Norvigs excellent talk, the question is, when to watch out for the flu, e.g. if you live in Denmark?

1) Go to www.google.com/trends/
2) Type in the word “influenza”
3) Select your geographical region (Denmark in my case)
4) See data up to year 2008, to avoid the graph being squished by the outbreak of A(H1N1) (which leads to unusually many people talking about the flu)

Turns out the answer is: watch out in October and February.